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        The Dental Handpiece Post

A comprehensive source for dental hand piece repair, dental instrument sharpening, dental instrument re-tipping, and maintenance tips.


                                   
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WHY ARE THE “O” RINGS REPLACED ?
Posted on 01/25/2021 by The Handpiece Post 
 
 
At Bauer Dental we offer free turbine installation whether you purchase the turbine from me or not.

Under this program I see many new turbines installed by the doctor that do not run correctly. There is no fault to the doctor who installed the turbine correctly. However no “O” rings or replacement washers came with this new turbine. Therefore the doctor did not know to install them.

The handpiece might squeal or sing, and or it may slow down. With every turbine installation these parts must be installed.

The “O” rings will be hardened over time with repeated autocalving. When they loose their pliability they will aspirate air into the handpiece causing a squeal or singing.

Also the dirty air aspirated into the drill will get into the bearings causing premature failure.

The washer must be replaced because it will loose tension over time allowing for play in the position of the turbine causing the same problems. The washer also offers a cushioning, a smoothing of the turbine. In other words it allows for a little play to smooth out vibration allowing more comfort for the user and longer life.

Some service techs only replace the rear “O” ring in the back cap and not the front one. The one in the rear is the easiest to replace. The front one can take a bit of patience. It is essential that both of the “O” rings be replaced with every repair.

The “O” rings hold the bearings in the back cap and in the head of the handpiece. This also provides an airtight seal which prevents aspiration of debris back into the handpiece. If either “O” ring is compromised, the drill will leak air causing a loss of torque an the issues described above.
If organic dust is aspirated back into the handpiece the debris will be baked into the bearings, the impeller and even the chuck causing the drill to run at a lower torq and also causing premature failure.

Over a few days and even weeks the bearings will fail and sometimes the entire turbine must be changed.

The “O” rings and washer should be replaced with every repair, We replace them when we get them in for maintenance. Even if there is no problem with the unit.

I have found over the years that if you use a good quality “O” ring and quality bearing, you will have a solid handpiece repair.

However do not forget proper maintenance, it is essential for any dental drill repair.

Even the best repair is only as good as the maintenance provided by your practice.

By the way, if you send me a drill where you have purchased a new turbine and it did not work correctly, I will install the “O” rings and the washer at no charge to you as a good will service. If you purchased the turbine from me I will include the parts needed for a good repair.
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Get The Most From Your Dental Instrument Investment
Posted on September 28, 2016 by The Handpiece Post 
 
One of the common reasons for dental instrument re-tipping and instrument replacement is corrosion on the blade of the instrument. As you know corrosion is totally preventable by properly cleaning the instruments after each use.

The corrosion is caused by blood pathogens in the saliva and organic material. If these pathogens are not washed off thoroughly, it will cause corrosion on the instrument. This corrosion will cause pitting in the blade of your instrument. 

Typically the instrument cannot be sharpened and must be re-tipped or replaced. This can be quite annoying when your instruments are new or newly sharpened and already need to be re-tipped. 

Should I mention the cost, it can add up fast. Improper cleaning and then using the autoclave will only make the corrosion worse. Improper autoclave settings can cause instruments to rust.

Take the time to wash each instrument completely. Using a stiff brush and an antibacterial wash is recommended. When all saliva and blood are removed, then autoclave. Cover proper procedures with your staff to make sure everyone is on the same page.

You may be interested to know that a high percentage of my re-tipping work is from improperly cared for instruments and not instruments that have been worn out. The dental instruments that are made of high grade 440A stainless steel and will last a long time with proper care. Proper care and maintenance can save you hundreds per year in re-tipping costs.

If you have plastic handles and certain brands of instruments then you will be replacing the instrument.

You may be curious about what I can do for your instruments if they are corroded. First, if the corrosion is not too deep I may be able to polish it out of the instrument. 

There are a few tools to do this depending on the angle and type of instrument. If the damage is on the cutting edge it really depends on how deep the corrosion is whether I can save the end or not. 

Typically you will loose some of the instrument to regain usability.

All Bearings Are Not Created Equal
Posted on September 28, 2016 by The Handpiece Post 
Radial Bearing With A Crown Retainer
There are large and distinct differences between which bearings that are used in dental hand piece repair.
The bearing used can have a large impact on performance and budget.
.
There are two types of bearing other than physical size and exterior design. What I mean by exterior design is flanged or smooth bearing exterior.
For the purpose of this discussion we will examine the difference between the radial and angular bearing. The ball bearing retainer inside the bearing is the difference. 
The angular bearing is fully contained, meaning the bearing rides inside the retainer as viewed below.
The main advantage of the radial bearing is that it may be loaded axially from either side.
A large advantage of the angular bearing is that it will typically last longer at the higher speeds of the dental high speed hand piece. However they must be axially loaded from only one side.
The largest single way to gain the longest time between repairs is to keep your drills maintained as per manufactures recommendations.
I would recommend you discuss your options with your dental hand piece repair service company to get the best benefit for your practice.
 The Radial bearing rides inside a crown shaped retainer as shown above.
All Bearings Are Not Created Equal
Posted on September 28, 2016 by The Handpiece Post 
Radial Bearing With A Crown Retainer
There are large and distinct differences between which bearings that are used in dental hand piece repair.
The bearing used can have a large impact on performance and budget.
.
There are two types of bearing other than physical size and exterior design. What I mean by exterior design is flanged or smooth bearing exterior.
For the purpose of this discussion we will examine the difference between the radial and angular bearing. The ball bearing retainer inside the bearing is the difference. 
The angular bearing is fully contained, meaning the bearing rides inside the retainer as viewed below.
The main advantage of the radial bearing is that it may be loaded axially from either side.
A large advantage of the angular bearing is that it will typically last longer at the higher speeds of the dental high speed hand piece. However they must be axially loaded from only one side.
The largest single way to gain the longest time between repairs is to keep your drills maintained as per manufactures recommendations.
I would recommend you discuss your options with your dental hand piece repair service company to get the best benefit for your practice.
 The Radial bearing rides inside a crown shaped retainer as shown above.
All Bearings Are Not Created Equal
Posted on September 28, 2016 by The Handpiece Post 
Radial Bearing With A Crown Retainer
There are large and distinct differences between which bearings that are used in dental hand piece repair.
The bearing used can have a large impact on performance and budget.
.
There are two types of bearing other than physical size and exterior design. What I mean by exterior design is flanged or smooth bearing exterior.
For the purpose of this discussion we will examine the difference between the radial and angular bearing. The ball bearing retainer inside the bearing is the difference. 
The angular bearing is fully contained, meaning the bearing rides inside the retainer as viewed below.
The main advantage of the radial bearing is that it may be loaded axially from either side.
A large advantage of the angular bearing is that it will typically last longer at the higher speeds of the dental high speed hand piece. However they must be axially loaded from only one side.
The largest single way to gain the longest time between repairs is to keep your drills maintained as per manufactures recommendations.
I would recommend you discuss your options with your dental hand piece repair service company to get the best benefit for your practice.
 The Radial bearing rides inside a crown shaped retainer as shown above.

All Bearings Are Not Created Equal
Posted on 01/ 25 / 2021 by The Handpiece Post 

There are large and distinct differences between which bearings that are used in dental hand piece repair. The bearing used can have a large impact on performance and budget.
.
There are two types of bearing other than physical size and exterior design. What I mean by exterior design is flanged or smooth bearing exterior.

For the purpose of this discussion we will examine the difference between the radial and angular bearing. The ball bearing retainer inside the bearing is the difference. 
The angular bearing is fully contained, meaning the bearing rides inside the retainer as viewed below.

The main advantage of the radial bearing is that it may be loaded axially from either side.

A large advantage of the angular bearing is that it will typically last longer at the higher speeds of the dental high speed hand piece. However they must be axially loaded from only one side.

The largest single way to gain the longest time between repairs is to keep your drills maintained as per manufactures recommendations.

I would recommend you discuss your options with your dental hand piece repair service company to get the best benefit for your practice.

The Radial bearing rides inside a crown shaped retainer.


All new dental instruments are not created equally
Posted on January 20, 2021 by The Handpiece Post 


With the economy the way it is many of us are looking for any way possible to save money. So a lot of dental offices are purchasing lower cost instruments. If you are doing this, you may not be saving as much as you think.


You may even be spending more in the long haul. I would advise against purchasing any instruments or products of any kind from Pakistan or China. Ask your dealer where the units are coming from before you purchase them.


I have found that these instruments are of inferior quality. The quality of manufacturing seems to be very inconsistent. These units break at a very high rate. Because of this I see them in for repair and sharpening every day.


Many cannot be re-tipped due to non standard sizes. An example of this is hygienist instruments that come in for re-tipping have non-standard holes for the tips and cannot be re-tipped and must be replaced. 


Some other problems you may run into involve needle holders and cutters with loose joints that cannot be repaired because the inferior steel has worn prematurely.


When selecting new instruments, start with made in USA. After this ask about the grade of steel used in their manufacturing. Any instrument you purchase should be manufactured with 440A American made surgical stainless steel. With this standard you can shop price.


Consider Bauer Dental for your new instruments. All of our products are made with the highest quality surgical steel and are made in the USA. Our prices are discounted from retail and are very competitive.


Also we don’t sell instruments that cannot be re-tipped. Download our price sheet and compare our repair and sharpening prices. Click here to go to our website and click on the downloadable PDF file. Or you can call Howard at 317-652-8584 to discuss your instrument replacement and repair needs

 

The Best Way To Clean Your Dental Instruments And save Money On Dental Instrument Re-tipping 

Posted on Jan 11, 2021 by The Handpiece Post 


Sharpening and dental instrument re-tipping is what I do each day. You likely already know that quality dental instruments are made of high grade 440A stainless steel. With proper care the tips should wear out before I see them for re-tipping.

Plastic and molded instruments are not re-tippable.
Call to find out if your instruments can be re-tipped


Your dental instruments cost a lot of money. So I wonder why I re-tip so many that are corroded. As I speak to many hygienist’s I find there is a huge gap in the way instruments are cleaned. Part of the confusion is the large amount of generic cleaning solutions on the market.

Make sure the cleaning method and cleaning product you use is recommended by your dealer or manufacturer. This way you will get the correct product for your instruments. Also refer to my other articles on instruments to identify specific corrosion and stain issues.


The corrosion can be caused by blood and saliva. If these pathogens are not washed off completely, it can cause pitting on the instrument. If the corrosion erodes the edge then the blade has been compromised causing lower efficiency and the possibility that the instrument may fail. If the corrosion is in another place on the instrument then the integrity of the instrument may be compromised and it could break.

How irritating when your instruments are new, just been re-tipped or newly sharpened and already need dental instrument re-tipping.

My personal preference is to wash the instruments by hand using a stiff nylon brush and an mild antibacterial low PH wash. When all saliva and blood are removed, then autoclave.

Cover proper procedures with your staff to make sure everyone is on the same page. I would discourage using steel wool as this may damage the finish. Check with your manufacturer for the proper solution and method including autoclave settings. Make sure the instrument is rinsed completely to remove all of the cleaning solution.



The Handpiece Post

What Do The Stains On Your Dental Instruments Mean
Posted on Jan 11, 2021 by The Handpiece Post

Did you know the most common concern about dental instruments that are stained is that they may be rusting. In fact rusting on quality instruments is very unusual and may indicate improper care. 


The discoloration is usually due to improper cleaning and is indicative of some type of deposit left on the instrument.


The stain will typically show up after sterilization.


Notice the color of the stain, this will help in the identification of the source of the stain.
If you have a stain that is light brown and or slight orange in color, look for dried blood being the most common.


Other causes are cold sterilization, some detergents, instrument wrappings and or your water supply. This color of stain represents a phosphate layer has formed on the instrument causing the discoloration.


When you have a black stain, the most common cause is the detergent used for cleaning.
Check that the PH in your cleaning solution is optimal for the instrument. A PH that is too high and too low can cause an acidic reaction. Check with your distributor or manufacturer for the recommended solution.


The most common stain is dried blood left on the instrument causing a dark brown color. Dried blood will react to the instrument causing a corrosive reaction. All blood should be cleaned immediately and thoroughly.


For more information visit us at DentalInstrumentSolutions.com .



The Best Way To Clean Your Dental Instruments and save Money On Dental Instrument Re-tipping
Posted on Jan 10, 2021 by The Handpiece Post

Sharpening and dental instrument re-tipping is what I do each day. You likely already know that quality dental instruments are made of high grade 440A stainless steel. With proper care the tips should wear out before I see them for re-tipping.

Plastic and molded instruments are not re-tippable.
Call to find out if your instruments can be re-tipped

Your dental instruments cost a lot of money. So I wonder why I re-tip so many that are corroded. As I speak to many hygienist’s I find there is a huge gap in the way instruments are cleaned. Part of the confusion is the large amount of generic cleaning solutions on the market.

Make sure the cleaning method and cleaning product you use is recommended by your dealer or manufacturer. This way you will get the correct product for your instruments. Also refer to my other articles on instruments to identify specific corrosion and stain issues.

The corrosion can be caused by blood and saliva. If these pathogens are not washed off completely, it can cause pitting on the instrument. If the corrosion erodes the edge then the blade has been compromised causing lower efficiency and the possibility that the instrument may fail. If the corrosion is in another place on the instrument then the integrity of the instrument may be compromised and it could break.

How irritating when your instruments are new, just been re-tipped or newly sharpened and already need dental instrument re-tipping.

My personal preference is to wash the instruments by hand using a stiff nylon brush and an mild antibacterial low PH wash. When all saliva and blood are removed, then autoclave.

Cover proper procedures with your staff to make sure everyone is on the same page. I would discourage using steel wool as this may damage the finish. Check with your manufacturer for the proper solution and method including autoclave settings. Make sure the instrument is rinsed completely to remove all of the cleaning solution.



What You Should Know About Sharpening And Re-Tipping
Posted on January 06, 2021 by The Handpiece Post


When a Dental Instrument is not sharpened properly it can cause the hygienist to use too much pressure. This can lead to discomfort for the hygienist and the patient. There is also the danger of the instrument slipping. If your instruments are worn too thin, breakage of the instrument may be the result.


I often see instruments in my office for sharpening and the instruments have been improperly sharpened. On a curette for example the toe may be worn to a point. When this is the case the instrument should no longer be sharpened.


The only option for this instrument is re-tipping. Most instrument sharpening specialists will recommend the unit be re-tipped when 20 percent of the instrument is worn down. At 20 percent the instrument no longer functions to proper clinical effect. The largest danger is that the instrument will break.


There are some manufacturers arguing against re-tipping instruments saying that the quality of tips being used are inferior to the original. They also argue that the handles can crack.


I would counter these arguments with the fact that technicians use the same tips that the manufacturer uses. Your service company should always use the same stainless steel or titanium tips that came with the unit.


As far as the handles cracking, yes they sometimes do but the instrument is useless anyway. Also the handle can be replaced just like the tips can. At this point you have a new instrument at less cost than the OEM manufacturer.


So how do we keep re-tipping and sharpening costs to a minimum? First inspect and clean each end and don’t forget the handle. Make sure all debris are removed. The organic matter contains pathogens that will corrode the instrument. I get so many instruments that are new and just being sharpened for the first time and they have to be re-tipped because of corrosion.


Cleaning by hand can be dangerous, so it is best to use an ultrasonic machine. Some times you may not be able to use the ultrasonic immediately after use. When this happens I would recommend setting up a pre-soak until you can clean them properly. This will prevent drying and corrosion and supplement the cleaning process. I recommend the use of an enzymatic low suds solution for pre-soak and ultrasonic cleaning.


Many of you sharpen your own instruments. Most use a stone. Here are some tips to help you save money. Look at the blade under light, if it reflects light it needs sharpened. While there are no set rules on how often you should sharpen this is what I have found to be true. Sharpen your instruments after each use or at least the very first sign of going dull. If you do this you will take off less metal and the instruments will last longer. Next most people who use a stone will put on a different edge each time. It is almost impossible to get the perfect edge consistently. I recommend sending your instruments to a professional sharpener every two or three months depending on how much you use them. Your sharpener has equipment that can put the exact angle on the instrument and re-tip as needed.


I know your time is valuable, if you sharpen this way it only takes seconds to hone the edge and only minuets to keep them all sharp. While sending them to a professional sharpener will guarantee a proper edge and that the tips are not too worn.


For more information visit us at www.bauerdentalhandpiecerepair.com or call Howard at 317-652-8584




The Largest Reason For Dental Instrument Re-tipping

Posted by The Hand Piece Post on Jan 4, 2021


The largest reason for dental instrument re-tipping that I see in my service company is that the practice waits way too long to sharpen. Waiting longer to sharpen will not save you money. What it will do is cause discomfort to the patient and the hygienist.


The patient may have more bruising of the gum and the hygienist may have cramping in the hand. 


What I see is a dull instrument that I have to take off more metal than normal to gain sharpness When the instrument is dull, the blade surface will become rounded. This area has to come off to regain sharpness. 


Sharpen your instruments on a regular basis will keep your instruments in top condition. They will also last longer. 


Another reason for dental instrument re-tipping is corrosion on the blade of the instruments. This corrosion is totally preventable by washing the instruments after each use. The corrosion is caused by blood pathogens in the saliva. If these pathogens are not washed off thoroughly, it will cause corrosion on the instrument. 


This corrosion will destroy your mirrors and require new mirror ends be installed. Scalars and other instruments can corrode on the sharp edge of the instrument causing the need for re-tipping.


This can be quite annoying when your instruments are new or newly sharpened and already need to be re-tipped. Should I mention the cost, it can add up fast. Improper cleaning and then using the autoclave will only make the corrosion worse.


Take the time to wash each instrument completely. Use a stiff brush and an antibacterial wash. When all saliva and blood are removed, then autoclave. Cover proper procedures with your staff to make sure everyone is on the same page.


You may be interested to know that most of my re-tipping work is from improperly cared for instruments and not instruments that have been worn out. Dental instruments are made of high grade stainless steel and will last a long time with proper care.


You may be curious about what I can do for your instruments if they are corroded. First, if the corrosion is not too deep I may be able to polish it out of the instrument. 


There are a number of tools to do this depending on the angle and type of instrument. If the damage is on the cutting edge it really depends on how deep the corrosion is whether I can save the end or not.


Second if the corrosion is in the cutting edge, then I may have to grind it off to save the instrument. You should note that some corrosion can be taken out but the instrument is permanently pitted. Whether the instrument is re-tipped at this point depends on the doctor or hygienist. In most cases if the instrument is usable the doctor or hygienist will not opt for re-tipping. However even if I am able to save the instrument today and avoid the cost of re-tipping you have still lost some valuable life for your instrument and that only translates in money lost for your practice.



Dental Hand Piece Maintenance 
Posted on January 5, 2021 by The Handpiece Post 

Over the years I have seen many web pages and read many articles on high-speed hand piece maintenance and Dental Drill Repair. Most are very similar, however as I talk to dentists and hygienists I am finding varied methods of maintenance. It is my intention to offer my experience on hand piece maintenance and hopefully save you some money.

First, always follow your manufacturers recommendations for hand piece maintenance. Make sure your hand piece is used at the proper PSI, usually between thirty and forty PSI. If you run your drill at a higher pressure you will certainly cut the life of your bearings and the chuck. Also running your drill with the burr pulled out to gain extra reach will destroy the chuck and bearings very fast.

Second, wash the outer casing with alcohol or warm water and a soft to medium bristle brush depending on need. Please do not soak the hand piece under water or in any type of chemical. Do not use an ultrasonic cleaner unless recommended by the manufacturer.

Before we go any further you may want to know a little bit about the technical operation of the high-speed hand piece and how it collects debris. The high-speed hand piece pushes air from the the top and bottom of the head. When you let off the air control or rheostat the hand piece will shut down. At this time the hand piece draws in fine particulates of dust partials. This is because at the time you let off the air the air flow is reversed bringing in tooth dust and other contaminants. If the debris is not removed the contaminants will bake into the turbine and inside the chuck causing premature failure.

Based on my experience and conversations with various repair professionals there are five basic steps for high-speed hand piece maintenance. We have already covered two.

Third, choose your lubricant. Sprays are good but they have a propellant that needs to evaporate before the lubricant is left. I use an oil pen or syringe. For me this is the better way to go because you have direct control of your oil. The oil you use should meet of exceed the manufacturers specifications. If you use a spray, make sure you have the correct nozzle.

If you don’t, buy one because you won’t be able to get the oil where it needs to be. Use two or three blasts of one second each into the air hole. The air hole is the smaller one of the two hole system and the middle one for the three hole system. If you use an oil pen place three drops into the air hole. Use the same procedure for the chuck. One shot of spray or one drop of oil from the oil pen. Work the chuck by placing a burr in and out making sure the oil is thoroughly worked in.

Also the burr must be clean of contaminant. Reconnect the drill back up to the air and run at normal PSI with the burr inserted for about twenty or thirty seconds over a paper towel. look for the oil to be clear. If not repeat this procedure until it is. Now put in a burr and run for forty seconds at normal air pressure and look for contaminate. If the oil is clean it is time to autoclave.

Fourth, autoclave as normal. Do not stack hand pieces in the autoclave.
Fifth, after you autoclave spray a one second blast into the air hole and one more into the chuck. One drop each for the oil pen. Hook up to air and run for 30 or forty seconds to purge the last of the oil and have a properly running hand piece.

If you observe these procedures you will save hundreds per year on high-speed hand piece repair.

Bauer is your best source for Dental Drill Repair and dental Instrument Sharpening. For more information on dental drill repair visit us at http://www.bauerdentalhandpiecerepair.com/.



Repairing Your Dental Handpiece

Posted on Jan 1, 2021 by The Handpiece Post


What do we do with your highspeed dental handpiece when we receive it for repair?


Personally I start with a good visual inspection looking for obvious damage that might warrant repair. If all is OK there, then a burr is placed in the chuck and removed several times. This will let me know if the chuck in engaging. A pull tester is then used to check the tightness of the chuck. If the chuck fails this test, then the turbine will be changed. 


The complete turbine must be changed when failing this test to protect you and the patient from the burr disengaging.


In this case because even if the bearings are still good, they cannot be pulled and used again. If the unit passes the pull test, the unit is hooked up to an air station. Running the unit at 32 PSI, and listening carefully it can be determined if the bearings are defective. This is also a good time to test the water jets


If the bearings must be replaced, then the back cap is removed using a back cap tool. This will expose the turbine and it can be removed at this time. Once the turbine is removed the “O” rings must also be removed.


At this time the inside of the drill head and the back cap will be cleaned completely. All debris and particulate must be removed. It can also be determined how well your handpiece is maintained based on the condition inside the head of the handpiece. 


Once cleaned the “O” rings will be replaced with new ones. If there are any washers and/or clips they will be replaced at this time. 


If there was a water problem then using a special tool, the front of the handpiece can be removed and the seals replaced. Also the jets can be cleaned at this time


Now the turbine can be replaced. We use sing Myonic ceramic bearings with our turbines.


Place the rear bearing into the back cap and holding the back cap place the turbine into the head and screw the back cap into place. Insert a burr and move it around a bit to position the turbine. Hook up and test. If performed properly the dental handpiece repair will be completed.


There are other problems that can occur with the dental handpiece such as fiber optics and water lines. However the repair described above is the typical repair we see with the highspeed dental handpiece.


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